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God The Artist

Exodus 3:1-2,18-22 Now Moses was keeping the flock of his father-in-law, Jethro, the priest of Midian, and he led his flock to the west side of the wilderness and came to Horeb, the mountain of God. And the angel of the LORD appeared to him in a flame of fire out of the midst of a bush. He looked, and behold, the bush was burning, yet it was not consumed... And they will listen to your voice, and you and the elders of Israel shall go to the king of Egypt and say to him, ‘The LORD, the God of the Hebrews, has met with us; and now, please let us go a three days’ journey into the wilderness, that we may sacrifice to the LORD our God.’ But I know that the king of Egypt will not let you go unless compelled by a mighty hand. So I will stretch out my hand and strike Egypt with all the wonders that I will do in it; after that he will let you go. And I will give this people favor in the sight of the Egyptians; and when you go, you shall not go empty, but each woman shall ask of her neighbor, and any woman who lives in her house, for silver and gold jewelry, and for clothing. You shall put them on your sons and on your daughters. So you shall plunder the Egyptians.”

We come to the point in Moses' life where he is being called into God's service, and like I was once reminded, this was the third third of his life. The first forty years were spent as royalty in Egypt, the next forty as a shepherd in the land of Midian and the last forty as leader of a nation as he led the captive Israelites away from Egyptian bondage.

We note God's amazing way of getting a shepherd's attention, the forward covenant God makes with Moses to show He will see him through, the great promise of delivery, the leadership role Moses would be given, the acceptance of the elders of Israel, the hardness of Pharaoh's heart and finally the plunder of the Egyptians after their women give their riches.

God heard the mourning of the Israelites who had to toil day and night for the oppressive Egyptians. This was foretold to Abraham, came to pass and now we wonder why God would permit such suffering.

Four hundred and thirty years of oppression is what the Israelites had to undergo before they were led out of Egypt and does that not seem a bit much of suffering?

When we gaze at the thousands of years recorded in the Bible across millions of lives over a small geography, we see the realities of this God which are sometimes hard to digest.

This great God who who chose to be referred to as the great 'I AM' or 'eh-yeh works on an agenda that certainly is not of human bent.

I like to think of God as a painter with an open canvas and his paints are our choices, actions, relationships, emotions, etc. and God works through these volatile and dynamic elements to bring together the perfect picture He had in mind.

I do not mean to picture God as a tyrant or someone who is heartless but I mean to picture God as gentle and caring, yet mighty and awesome, who feels for each of us individually yet works for all of mankind holistically to ensure that all goes to plan, a perfect and righteous plan.

Moses questioned God’s plan just as we do when situations crop up in our lives but God who is sovereign over all works beyond our doubts and fears to establish His perfect will.

How long are you going to fight God’s will that was not quashed by slavery, torture or even the cross of Calvary?

Are you willing to give Jesus Christ the reins to your life and your challenges and permit Him to lead you to His father’s throne?

In His Loving Service,

ServantBoy

Proverbs 16:7 When a man's ways are pleasing to the LORD, He makes even his enemies to be at peace with him.

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2.7.2011

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